Croatia: Trogier to Zadar

Esprit’s route in the Adriatic.

After saying goodbye to Reini and Lynne, we spent another two days at Trogier Marina before setting sail to go northwest up the Croatian coast. The weather continued to be wet and cold, proving that at 44 degree latitude north in the Adriatic Sea, summer comes later than our friends who were sailing in Greece and Turkey, were experiencing at 37 degrees north.

Leaving Trogier old town.

Anchored in Vinisce.

Vinisce waterfront.

The first three days provided little in the way of wind, which meant a lot of motoring with fairly average scenery on land of new developments. We stopped at Vinisce, Rogoznica and Razanj. Once we headed up the Luka canal, the scenery improved as we reached Sibenik.

Sailing past Sibenik.

We were now in a massive inland waterway that took us about 10 nm inland to Skradin, which is as far as Esprit could go before a low road bridge. Tickets from the National Parks allowed us to take a ferry another 3 nm into the Krka National Park to the Skradinski Buk waterfalls.

Esprit’s route on the vast waterway of the Luka canal.

Going under the road bridge to Skradin.

Skradin town.

One of the many swans that welcomed us.

With the rains we had over the previous two days, the waterfalls were in full flood and quite beautiful – it reminded us of a mini version of the Iguazu falls between Brazil and Argentina. Back  on Esprit, the wind picked up to 40 knots from the northeast and we spent an anxious night anchored off Skradin town on the Krka river.

Entrance into the Krka Park.

The travertine falls.

More falls.

More falls as we climb higher.

Water everywhere.

Walkways so close, you can touch the water.

At first light the following morning, we ducked downstream to Vrulje to get into the lee of the land. Charlie, a local fisherman came over to suggest we re-anchor further into the cove, as there was an even stronger westerly coming through that evening. The following day, we motored to Zaton village where the anchorage was too narrow for us, so we carried on to Sibenik, and found shelter in a bay south of the town.

Zaton village.

This was a good choice, as we were near a ships chandler where we bought a discharge pipe for the toilet to the holding tank, to replace a blocked pipe. Four hours later and a new passage cut through two bulkheads with a 55mm hole saw, the job was done. We settled down with celebratory drinks, as it was the 15th May, our third anniversary since sailing out of Sydney.

Back in Sibenik, the barrel vaulted cathedral.

We enjoyed Sibenik before motoring to Vodice, seven miles to the northwest. The sun came out at last and we explored the town to buy fruit and veg at the market and groceries, wine and beer at the Tommy hypermarket. The sunny period was short lived as it clouded over the next day, but with a nice 25 knot south easterly to take us 20 nm north to Hramina where we found shelter.

Leaving Sibenik – WW2 shelters for submarines.

The Venetian fortification at the entrance of the Luka canal.

Opposite it, the lighthouse.

What’s wrong with this picture? The new hotel next to the town of Vodice.

Hramina, like most of the towns further north, has a marina for the exclusive use of a charter company. The company at this marina for example, had more than 80 vessels, of which about half were Jeanneau SO 439 monohulls like Esprit, with also smaller and bigger Jeanneau’s. These were in the company of about 20 American Lagoon catamarans.

Lagoon of course, wins the prize for building floating camper vans that least resemble sailing vessels, often challenged by Leopard catamarans. However, the Hummer military combat vehicle aesthetic of Lagoon cats, tip the scales in their favour. Different strokes for different folks.

Hramina peninsula – the sunken Roman town of Colentum at top left.

Colentum partially visible.

Walking up Gradina hill – the church and cemetery below.

View from Gradina to Hramina marina.

View up to the islands.

Fresh calamari paella from the market.

After some good walks around Hramina, a strong south easterly took us swiftly to Zadar, a large city, 22 nm to the northwest. We will spend a few days here to get prices for a new anchor windlass, as the original one sounds as though it will kark it at any minute. So, rather than wait for that surprise and pull up the anchor and chain by hand, let’s be ready with a replacement.

We will keep you posted on developments.

Cheers for now.

4 Comments

  1. You take me back almost 10 years when I spent 3 summers exploring Croatia and visiting all those great places.
    The Croatian marina authorities were getting greedy and one had to pay to anchor in a remote bay. Marina fees rose sharply and the yachting fraternity started to leave Croatia in great numbers.
    There was still more yachts than marina berths however so the authorities were smug about that. Even some charter companies exited the islands. I wonder whether this has been corrected ? Greed is an awful thing whether perpetuated by individuals or government authorities.
    Having said that I se you are having a great time and I am envious as always.
    My turn will come soon when I join you for a cruise along the foot of Italy and possibly up the straights and the coast of Cicily.
    Can’t wait !!

    • Hi Dave

      The impression we get is that business has slowed down for the Croatians. When we checked in at Cavtat, the Harbour master said to us they were worried that sailing traffic will drop this year, as charter companies were moving back to Greece, due to the high costs in Croatia. The government reduced the cruising tax “vignette” this year to help things along, but it still amounts to AUD10/day (R100/day).

      The marinas are ridiculously expensive, so we are anchoring in most towns and haven’t been asked for money so far. Hope it stays that way! Look forward to Patricia and your visit.

      Cheers

      • Dave Bruce

        It sounds as though nothing much has changed.
        The authorities seem to think that all sailors are multi millionaires.
        Greed cometh before a fall !!!!

        Enjoy Croatia none the less !!

  2. Denis & Toody Cassidy, Cape Town.

    Stunning!
    Thanks so much for keeping us in the loop MUCH appreciated. Love reading all about your adventures and seeing your magnificent pics. Can’t believe your travels have been this long already. Wonderful!
    Lots of love
    Denis & Toods

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