Curacao 2.

We arrived in Curacao during the rainy season, with the result that the rain came bucketing down for days on end, which was good for filling our water tanks, but not so good for exercise. Whenever there was a break in the rain, we bolted out on walks into the country, or to the supermarket.

Going bush – Spanish Water, on our way to the ocean beaches.

Caracas Bay on the ocean side – a cruise liner and an oil rig laid up due to Covid.

Papagayo Beach with mostly Dutch tourists.

In between, we did work on the boat or had other cruisers over for drinks. Ed and Natalie from Montreal in Canada took us along in their car to do shopping, so we reciprocated with a dinner at Taboosh, a restaurant on the Spanish Water with local cuisine.

Dirk, Ed, Natalie & Annie at Taboosh.

The bus service into town gave us the opportunity to explore the towns of Punda and Otrabanda on opposite sides of the canal into Willemstad. On the Otrabanda side is the fantastic Kura Hulanda Museum, which is part of the urban renewal project which the Dutch entrepreneur and philanthropist, Jacob Dekker funded to the tune of many millions of dollars. Curacao was the centre of the slave trade in years past and the museum is a stark reminder of the terrible fate that befell these people from Africa. The museum has a valuable collection of African art which Dekker assembled over many years. Born in 1948, he sadly passed away a year ago from cancer at the age of 71.

Entrance to the museum.

A bust of Jacob Dekker.

“Mama Africa” sculpture in the museum courtyard, highlighting the origins of the slaves.

Started by the Portuguese in 1526, the current estimates are that about 12 million to 12.8 million Africans were shipped across the Atlantic Ocean over a span of 400 years. The number purchased by the traders was considerably higher, as the passage had a high death rate with approximately 1.2–2.4 million dying during the voyage and millions more died in seasoning camps in the Caribbean after arrival to the New World.

Millions of slaves also died as a result of slave raids and during transport to the African coast for sale to European slave traders. Near the beginning of the 19th century, various governments acted to ban the trade, although illegal smuggling still occurred. In the early 21st century, several governments issued apologies for the transatlantic slave trade. (Source: Wikipedia)

Model of a slave trading ship. In the holds of these ships, the slaves in chains, were crammed like sardines .

Sad!

Venice also has something to answer for it’s North African slave trading history.

Slave girls – I have only included photos of the less shocking exhibits in the museum.

Mural depicting slaves at work in the Caribbean.

Exit of the slave museum – Annie looking back, gobsmacked.

End of a sad chapter – celebrating the emancipation of the slaves in Curacao by King Willem III of the Netherlands.

The photos following, are of the redeveloped urban area in Kura Hulanda – with lots of public art around.

 

 

Cooling off with iced cappuccinos.

Dekker’s extensive African art collection.

Walking back to Punda.

Punda, which we explored on the other side of the canal, is a living and very colourful street art gallery, with artistic surprises around every corner. We enjoyed this so much, we went back two days later to explore the area further. Below, follows some photos of the street art, which don’t need further explanation.

We thought this building was a church – it is the Public Prosecutor’s office!

The Christmas decorations are coming out.

A Chichi Santa with reindeer.

Last night, we had cruisers from Australia and New Zealand around for drinks, all of us waiting for the Colombian border to open on the 1st December (hopefully). Like us, these boats, Merewether and Wild Thing are also planning to transit the Panama canal early in the new year, to start their Pacific crossing. We are all waiting with bated breath. We will report back early in December on our next move, so until then, keep safe and wear your masks.

8 Comments

  1. G.W.A. Lamsvelt

    Wij zijn ook in het slavenmuseum geweest. Ik was diepgeschokt toen ik eruit kwam. Wat een wreedheden zie je daar.!
    Wel goed dat het nu openlijk getoond wordt. Ben benieuwd naar jullie volgende stap
    groet Gijs

  2. Darrell

    Thanks for sharing your experiences. Being following your journey for over a year. We have done a few small excursions around the Mediterranean. But a little to novice for the long hauling. Enjoying the days through you folks. Keep well and safe.
    Darrell Krell , Vancouver B.C.

  3. Carla

    Ciao and thanks for the beautiful pics and info I love reading your blog. Today is my b-day I generally celebrate somewhere different since I love traveling . This time I really feel stuck at least you made me dream for a bit… Wish I was there with and lets celebrate in remote so U can have another fantastic tropical cocktail on my behalf and here I will have something special too…

    stay safe and have fun for me

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